Daan Viljoen Clinic

New Health Clinic

 

Daan Viljoen Clinic

New Health Clinic

 

Daan Viljoen Clinic

New Health Clinic

 

Daan Viljoen Clinic

New Health Clinic

 

Daan Viljoen Clinic

New Health Clinic

 

Daan Viljoen Clinic

New Health Clinic

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New Primary Health Clinic

Keetmanshoop has a functioning hospital, but there is also a great need for primary health services in the town. Some of these needs were addressed by the existing Daan Viljoen clinic that operated from three rooms adjacent to an old age a home in the residential township of Keetmanshoop. The small clinic was very busy and the increased need necessitated a larger size clinic. Recent additional requirements for the provision of counseling and testing for HIV and TB treatment were also lacking. The location of the clinic was ideal for the user population, and the old age home thus made an unused portion of their site available for the development of a new clinic that would meet all the requirements. The old clinic was converted to staff housing for the nurses.

Keetmanshoop climatic conditions are characterized by desert extremes with summer temperatures ranging from 34 degrees Celsius and above on average, and winter temperatures dropping to between 2-6 degrees in the daytime. The area is characterized by low rainfall and desert plants such as the iconic quiver tree abound. Wind speeds of up to 20km/hour mainly from the south are common, with average calm periods only amounting to 26% of total.

The design of the clinic had to ensure good shelter for waiting patients and users, and a design with an internal sheltered waiting space was conceived. The internal waiting space has a high internal volume and clerestory windows bring natural light and ventilation into the space. The clerestory windows can be closed in winter to ensure heat retention. Ceiling spaces were well insulated to maximize thermal comfort without the need for mechanical cooling. The roof material was chosen in a light off-white finish to maximize reflectiveness. An outside veranda, sheltered by the public bathrooms to east and west at the northern entrance to the clinic provides a protected outside waiting area. The more private southern sone of the clinic house the HIV and TB testing and counseling functions. A separate outside waiting space is provided, which will prevent the spread of air-born communicable disease to the other patients waiting inside the clinic.

Health- Munting Rechholtz Architects
Health- Munting Rechholtz Architects

The clinic is clad with natural slate tiles sourced from the direct vicinity of Keetmanshoop up to a dado height of 1,2 m above the plinth. This ensures a maintenance free finish and at the same time celebrates the natural slate resource abundant in the vicinity. The clinic nurses chose a cheerful bright red-orange paint colour for the walls above that echoes the deep red sunsets over the desert landscape and brings vibrant colour to the muted sandy hues that characterize daytime in Keetmanshoop. The site was landscaped with 66 indigenous trees and desert adapted groundcovers. It is envisioned that the surrounding trees will in time temper the harsh sunlight whilst providing shade around the building and the parking area. The ground covers will green the bare exposed soil of the original site. The clinic nurses are making an effort to keep the plants watered regularly until such time as they are established and can grow independently of additional irrigation.

Project Details

Location

Keetmanshoop, Karas, Namibia

Client Name

Department of Works, Namibia

User Client

Ministry of Health and Social Services, Namibia

Quantity surveyor

Godfrey Takayedza

Structural Engineer

Franscois le Roux Consulting engineers

Mechanical and Electrical

Fischer Buder Consulting Engineers

Contractor

D & K Builders

Project Value

N$ 10,5 million

Photographer

Markus Weiss

 
 
 
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